Webnesday (68): More Foggy, Foggy Dew

And now for something completely different. It has been my custom to present images in my Webnesday posts of the spiders whose acquaintance I happen to make, but this time I’m featuring the results of the work of many. We had spent the night in a much-too-expensive “boutique hotel” in the town of Bluff, at the extreme southern tip of the South Island, a little more than two weeks ago, and awoke to barely-above-freezing temperatures and some lovely fog. After an extremely mediocre breakfast, we drove north to Invercargill and settled in for a stroll into Queens Park (yes, Mrs. Thistlebottom, I spelled it correctly: There is no apostrophe; this is a recurring minor annoyance here, but that’s another story). This was, if memory serves, my fourth or fifth visit to Queens Park, and each one has been memorable in its own way. This time there was a special mystery (or should I say mistery) about it that we found especially endearing. And more to come, so stay tuned.

About krikitarts

Welcome to Krikit Arts! I'm a veterinarian; photographer; finger-style guitarist, composer, instructor, and singer/songwriter; fisherman; and fly-tyer. Please enjoy--and please respect my full rights to all photos on this Website!
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14 Responses to Webnesday (68): More Foggy, Foggy Dew

  1. I always enjoy seeing these sheet webs and of course dewy orb webs are a treat as well. A mediocre breakfast at an expensive boutique hotel sounds like you got ripped off.

    Apostrophes. I have two places I visit with the same conundrum. One is at Quabbin Reservoir where there is a spot named Hanks Meadow. The other is actually two places…Hunters Beach and Little Hunters Beach at Acadia N.P. I’ve seen all spelled, or is it spelt?, both ways. Guess it doesn’t matter because people know what you are talking about, but still…

    • krikitarts says:

      I wouldn’t quite go so far as to call it a ripoff, as they tried to be very welcoming and the location was certainly spectacular. But for the price (US $170), we had expected quite a bit more. Ah, well…

  2. Ms. Liz says:

    Initially I read mistery as misery! On re-checking I was glad to see it was actually mistery! If we’re in Bluff for breakfast we’d head to the cafe that’s in the Lighthouse Art Gallery. Haven’t been for a while now but when we have in the past, it’s been really nice!

    • krikitarts says:

      I’ll remember that in case we overnight in Bluff again (which I candidly doubt) and thank you once again for you local knowledge and eagerness to share it.

  3. The lack of apostrophes in names down there annoyed me, too. And yet the Te Ara “Encyclopedia of New Zealand” spells Arthur’s pass with an apostrophe. At the same time, over here Pikes Peak gets spelled without an apostrophe, Zebulon Pike notwithstanding. Here’s an article about the apostrophe-dropping trend at the National Park Service:

    https://www.reviewjournal.com/news/politics-and-government/obscure-federal-rule-erased-apostrophes-from-place-names/

    I’ll add some historical perspective: in Old English the -s ending of the possessive case was added without an apostrophe. Apostrophes were a nicety that came much later. And German still adds its genitive endings directly.

  4. I’ll add that we have vivid memories of Bluff due to the great swirls of kelp there:

    New Zealand: kelp in surf at Bluff

  5. shoreacres says:

    I especially like the second photo. The bluish cast to the webs is lovely against the greens. The way the weight of the droplets pulls the webs slightly downward is nice, too.

  6. Adrian Lewis says:

    Excellent photos and account, particularly love the “extremely mediocre breakfast” in the expensive boutique hotel, its amazing that such places keep going at all but I suppose some think them good. :)

  7. bluebrightly says:

    Wonderful photos, and isn’t it nice to know there’s more than one queen to honor, and the park doesn’t belong to any of them? ;-)

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