Isolation Antidotes (16): Just a Walk in the Park

Back in student days in West Berlin, there was a lovely park just a quarter-mile or so from our apartment, where I loved to go for walks with our two dogs. Spring was our favorite time of year, especially following a typically damp, dark, dreary, and dismal winter. This, around 1972, was one of those perfect spring days when the air was sweet with the perfume of fresh blossoms everywhere, birds singing and the almost overpowering promise of new life in the air. My camera was a Pentax Spotmatic, my film Ilford HP5.

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Welcome to Krikit Arts! I'm a veterinarian; photographer; finger-style guitarist, composer, instructor, and singer/songwriter; fisherman; and fly-tyer. Please enjoy--and please respect my full rights to all photos on this Website!
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23 Responses to Isolation Antidotes (16): Just a Walk in the Park

  1. Ms. Liz says:

    That’s a breathtaking spring photo, even in b&w. It feels so still and tranquil!

    • krikitarts says:

      That’s exactly why we were so attracted to it. Thanks, Liz!

      • Ms. Liz says:

        Would you be ok with me posting this image on my blog tomorrow? My blog is about exploring colour but occasionally I post a b&w to show how great an image can be without colour! This is a great example and I’d naturally credit to you and link back.

      • krikitarts says:

        Of course, Liz, your are welcome to. Thanks for asking–and thanks for the great compliment!

  2. Adrian Lewis says:

    Beautiful scene, Gary, love the leaning tree. And Spotmatic and HP5 are both familiar – in fact I think I started out in the 35mm world with HP3. :)

  3. Peter Klopp says:

    A walk through a park makes the experience after a long and damp winter all the more enjoyable. Great photo in monochrome!

  4. Beautiful scene, Gary.

  5. bluebrightly says:

    So lovely! And it takes me straight to northern Europe in April.

  6. I’ve never seen spring anywhere but the northeast USA but this does look so familiar and very nice as a monochrome. The ducks (?) make it perfect. I hope that tree is still leaning out over the pond after all these years.

    • krikitarts says:

      Yep, ducks. Coots were also common, but you’re right. Some day I’ll get back there to the old neighborhood and check on this little park (and the Fennsee) and see about that leaning tree. I can very well imagine it still hanging on with its seemingly tenuous toehold.

  7. Some would say the tree is leaning with meaning.

    In 1972 I was also using a Pentax Spotmatic. If you got yours outside the United States it might have said Asahi rather than Honeywell on it, as mine did, having been bought in the Panama Canal Zone.

    • krikitarts says:

      Mine was also an Asahi, and I bought it in Berlin. It was my first SLR and I immediately fell in love. My pevious camera was an Olympus Pen D, which I bought in Tokyo in 1964. It shot half-frame images, so I got 72 on a 36-exposure roll. I didn’t realize that the resolution would also be reduced by half, but I still have some fond memories.

      • A fellow Peace Corps volunteer brought the camera back to me in Honduras. It was my first SLR, too, and I remember sitting on my bed that day and going through the manual, where I learned about f/stops and shutter speeds.

      • krikitarts says:

        What a great way to start a lifelong love, eh?

      • Definitely. What’s strange is that when I heard he was going to get cameras for a few other people, on a whim I asked him to get one for me, too. I think it cost $135 in 1969, a lot of money for an impecunious Peace Corps volunteer.

      • krikitarts says:

        I had a friend in the military in Berlin to thank for mine; it was $142 with the 50mm f/1.4 lens. Well worth it!

  8. Helen Cherry says:

    A beautiful tranquil scene. Perfect balance between the strength of the trees on the right and the ducks .

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