Webnesday (52): House Hopper

Just the day before yesterday, while we were in my cave working on a surprise birthday present for one of our daughters, CD spied a tiny jumping spider, about a quarter of an inch (62 mm) long. I carefully caught it in a small plastic vial and took it out to release it on a flower, and from there to a jade plant, where it would have a far better chance of successful foraging. I have found it in my handy Spiders of New Zealand guide, and I’m quite confident that it was a male Hypoblemum albovittatum, commonly called a white-banded house jumping spider, or more simply, a house jumper, and they are reportedly common in the southern North Island and the northern South Island here, as well as in Queensland, Australia, where they originated. From the coloration, it’s clear that this was a male, and he was cooperative enough for me to make a few nice portraits. Isn’t he magnificent?! (For a more detailed view, just click on a photo.)

About krikitarts

Welcome to Krikit Arts! I'm a veterinarian; photographer; finger-style guitarist, composer, instructor, and singer/songwriter; fisherman; and fly-tyer. Please enjoy--and please respect my full rights to all photos on this Website!
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20 Responses to Webnesday (52): House Hopper

  1. Love those aquamarine eyes.😍

  2. Mike Powell says:

    Indeed he is magnificent, Gary. I am always amazed and entranced by the eyes of a jumping spider and the red head color of this one really makes him stand out. Great shots.

    • krikitarts says:

      As common as these are reported to be, I’m surprised that I’ve not seen more of them. I’m keeping a closer watch out now and hoping for many a new encounter. And yes, the red-orange head is really striking!

  3. Peter Klopp says:

    These are fascinating macro shots, especially the one with the spider.

  4. bluebrightly says:

    I’m not a spider fan, embarrassed to say it but there you are. But wow! Yes, what a guy! Good for you and yours, for the rescue and what luck on the poses. :-)

    • krikitarts says:

      I routinely rescue any outdoor spiders that I find indoors and put them back out. We have a number of happy-at-home-indoor varieties too, and we just leave them alone to help to take care of the occasional mosquito, fly, or fruit fly.

  5. shoreacres says:

    He’d make a wonderful brooch, with inset eyes of turquoise. These jumpers really are handsome. The little black and white ones I most often see are perfectly fine, but these colors — !

    • krikitarts says:

      Your little black and white ones are very likely zebra jumpers (Salticus scenicus); I’ve seen them in Michigan and Ohio for as long as I can remember, and more recently in Minnesota too. And if you’re impressed by the color of this one, have you heard of the peacock jumper (Maratus speciosus)? Google them and prepare for an amazing display!

  6. Adrian Lewis says:

    Yes, magnificent is the word; wonderful photos and that final one is truly superb. Adrian :)

  7. krikitarts says:

    Their eyes are so good that, at times, I can’t help thinking that when they look right at you like this, they are actually seeing and responding to their own reflections in the UV filter on the macro lens. There have been times, when I’ve been intimately close to one, that it has jumped onto the lens!

  8. Ooooo…more hairy palps. :-) This is a handsome dude with mesmerizing eyes and a redhead to boot.

  9. Meanderer says:

    What a beauty! Those gorgeous colours!! Ain’t Nature wunnerful :-)

  10. I like the head colors as revealed in the last picture.

  11. Pingback: Webnesday (54) | krikitarts

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